Great moments in the Hall of Fame’s Character and Integrity Clause: Curt Schilling edition

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I can’t decide if Bob Brookover’s Hall of Fame column is:

A. The coolest thing ever because it finally applies the character and integrity clause to something besides steroids;

B. The worst thing ever because of the thing to which he chooses to apply the character and integrity clause; or

C. Is actually a biting satire of other writers’ misguided Hall of Fame columns.

Hahaha, just kidding. I can decide. It’s weapons-grade stupid. After saying he doesn’t vote for Bagwell despite there being no evidence that he took steroids he says …

I’m just not sure I believe him, and the reason is because I’ve watched players lie in front of Congress. If they can lie there, they can lie anywhere about anything. Schilling, one of the more outspoken players in his contempt for steroid users, once was asked if he was still dipping smokeless tobacco during his playing days with the Phillies. He assured the questioners he was not. It was a lie that was revealed by his wife, Shonda, just a few days later.

That’s questionable integrity and character. Many of Schilling’s teammates would tell you he displayed a lack of character, sportsmanship, and integrity more than a few times during his career. I still think he belongs in the Hall of Fame, but the rules on the ballot would argue against his case.

This man has a Hall of Fame vote. Dozens of working baseball writers who spend countless hours thinking about baseball in non-idiotic ways don’t.