The Yankees’ non-Youkilis options for third base were … interesting

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I like the Kevin Youkilis signing by the Yankees. I’m not sure he has a return to form in him — it’s not the years, it’s the mileage, as the man once said — but if he does bounce back he’s gonna be nice to have around even if A-Rod does recover.

And let’s face it: the Yankees didn’t have unlimited options at third base. Indeed, as Sweeny Murti noted over the weekend, the pickings were pretty darn slim:

It is interesting to note that once word leaked out early this month about A-Rod’s status, the Yankees received plenty of inquiries from players and agents who felt they could help fill the hole. One was from Cody Ransom, the man who started the 2009 season as the Opening Day 3rd baseman when A-Rod has his first hip surgery.

I’m assuming some have chosen to have amnesia over this, but there were Yankees writers [cough] Ian O’Connor [cough] who made the straight-faced argument in early 2009 that the Yankees were better off with Ransom than A-Rod. It was all tied up in A-Rod’s PED revelation from that spring. But rather than simply note that it was a bummer of a story, some dudes decided to throw reason aside and actually say that A-Rod shouldn’t have gotten his job back when he came off the DL following his hip surgery.  Of course A-Rod went on to hit .286/.402/.532 with 30 homers, 100 RBI and led the Yankees to a World Series championship. Ransom was DFA’d that August.

Another one Murti mentions: Troy Glaus, who called the Yankees saying he was ready for a comeback. The same Troy Glaus who took all of 2011 off and then a year ago said he considered himself retired. In his last season, with the Braves, Glaus was limited to first base because he couldn’t make the throw from third.

So, yes, Kevin Youkilis is a pretty good option.

The Mets expect Tim Tebow to come back next year

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Mets assistant general manager John Ricco told Newsday today that he expects minor league outfielder Tim Tebow to return for a third season in professional baseball.

Tebow, 31, broke the hamate bone in his right hand while swinging a bat in late July, ending his season. It was a fairly successful season for him all things considered. After being promoted to Double-A Binghamton to start the year he hit .273/.336/.399 with six home runs, a stolen base and a .734 OPS in 298 plate appearances and made the Double-A All-Star team. That’s not the stuff of a top prospect — he strikes out far too much and the power numbers aren’t fantastic given that power would figure to be his strongest tool — but it’s pretty respectable for a guy his age and with his relative lack of baseball experience. As I said back in July, you can believe the Mets’ interest in Tebow is more marketing than baseball, but that does not preclude you from giving the guy a deserved tip of the cap for working hard and sticking it out in the bush leagues.

Assuming he does come back, the Mets are likely to start him at Triple-A Syracuse in the hopes that he’d eventually get to the bigs as a late season callup if the Mets aren’t in contention. Indeed, many believed that was the plan for him this year had he not been injured.