Yankees considering trade for Angels’ Vernon Wells?

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FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal provides the scoop:

The Yankees, sources say, are among the possibilities for [Vernon] Wells — the teams discussed him at the winter meetings, and Wells could fill the Yankees’ need for a right-handed hitting outfielder.

Wells has batted just .222 with a .667 OPS over the past two seasons and is owed salaries of $21 million in 2013 and 2014, but the Angels are surely willing to eat most of that remaining money. And Wells would probably be open to waiving his no-trade clause for a fresh start, and a chance at regular playing time.

Rosenthal says the Yankees are also “looking at” free agent Scott Hairston to fill their outfield vacancy but might not be willing to meet his desire for a two-year contract. The times, they certainly are a-changing.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.