The press is being kicked down the right field line in Anaheim

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The affects you almost not at all, but you will hear about it: the Angels are converting the press box in Angel Stadium to luxury seating, which in turn will push writers covering the team to a new press box down the right field line.

Needless to say, writers are not happy about it. Including the guy who will be president of the BBWAA next year:

Apparently this happened at U.S. Cellular Field a couple of years ago — the print media box is now down the right field line there too — and the consensus is that it’s the worst place for writers to cover a game.  Paul Hoynes of the Cleveland Plain-Dealer said that after the changes in Chicago, Bud Selig told writers that wouldn’t happen again. Hoynes suggested a BBWAA protest over it. Which, given that the BBWAA’s founding and, according to them, primary purpose, is to ensure reporter access to the ballpark, is probably the only avenue available.

I would expect such a protest to have approximately zero chance of success. Nothing that Bud Selig has done as commissioner suggests that he’s going to stand in the way of teams looking to maximize cash flow. And given that clubs and the league are less dependent upon the sporting press for publicity and information dissemination than they ever have been — and become less dependent upon it every day — what incentive do they have to cater to the ever-shrinking pool of sportswriters covering games from the press box?

In the meantime, know that if you snag some tickets on StubHub, you stand a much better chance of having a better view of things in Anaheim than the reporters do.  And, unlike them, you get to have beer and cheer too.

Tyler Glasnow scheduled to rejoin Rays’ rotation

Jonathan Dyer-USA TODAY Sports
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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Tampa Bay Rays right-hander Tyler Glasnow is scheduled to rejoin the rotation at Cleveland after missing nearly 14 months because of Tommy John surgery.

The Rays’ Opening Day starter last year hasn’t pitched this season after undergoing the procedure on Aug. 4, 2021.

“I think we’re pretty confident he’ll be starting for us,” Tampa Bay manager Kevin Cash said before the game with Toronto. “This is the first time he’s thrown pain-free in quite some time, so he’s encouraged by it.”

The 6-foot-8 right-hander went 5-2 with a 2.66 ERA in 14 starts last year and is a key addition as the Rays near a wild-card spot.

“Compared to the past, like, three years it feels way better as far as postday and the week leading into starts and stuff,” Glasnow said. “It’s good to have an UCL, you know.”

Cash said Glasnow will throw around 45 pitches in his initial outing, which should allow him to go two or three innings.

“Two innings of Glasnow is still a huge plus for our team,” Cash said. “Like to get three innings. If we do, great. If we don’t, that’s fine, too.”

Glasnow allowed one run, one hit, four walks and had 14 strikeouts over seven innings in four starts with Triple-A Durham.

“I’m really excited,” Glasnow said. “I’m approaching it like normal, staying on routine. Feels normal.”

Glasnow signed a two-year, $30.35 million contract that will delay the start of his free agency by one year last month. He’s making $5.1 million this year and will get $5.35 million next season and $25 million in 2024, which is the first year he would have been eligible for free agency.