Nationals sticking with two-year, $25 million offer to Adam LaRoche

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There haven’t been a ton of Adam LaRoche rumors swirling and most reports have the Nationals confident in re-signing the 33-year-old first baseman, perhaps leading to Michael Morse being traded.

As for what type of contract LaRoche may end up with, Thomas Boswell of the Washington Post writes that the Nationals haven’t changed their original offer of two years and $25 million.

LaRoche may be holding out for something closer to Mike Napoli’s three-year, $39 million deal with the Red Sox, especially since he out-produced Napoli in just about every major category this year. Of course, Napoli is a couple years younger, his previous track record is more impressive, and his ability to play catcher adds significant value in addition to his bat.

Teams that missed out on Josh Hamilton would seem like natural fits to intensify their pursuit of LaRoche, so it’ll be interesting to see if the Nationals eventually have to up that two-year offer. LaRoche became a free agent out by declining his half of a $10 million mutual option and then turning down the $13.3 million qualifying offer.

MLB calls umpire union statement about Manny Machado discipline “inappropriate”

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Earlier today the Major League Baseball Umpire’s Association made multiple posts on social media registering its displeasure at what it feels was the league’s weak discipline of Manny Machado following his run-in with umpire Bill Welke. It was an unusual statement, as it’s not common for umpires, individual or via their union to comment on such matters.

This evening, in an official statement, the league called it inappropriate:

“Manny Machado was suspended by MLB Chief Baseball Officer Joe Torre, who considered all the facts and circumstances of Machado’s conduct, including precedent, in determining the appropriate level of discipline.  Mr. Machado is appealing his suspension and we do not believe it is appropriate for the union representing Major League Umpires to comment on the discipline of players represented by the Players Association, just as it would not be appropriate for the Players Association to comment on disciplinary decisions made with respect to umpires.  We also believe it is inappropriate to compare this incident to the extraordinarily serious issue of workplace violence.”

That final bit, about workplace violence, is something that I didn’t really consider when I read the umps’ statements, but it’s a damn good point. In an age where people are literally shooting up workplaces, umpires making reference to that kind of thing in response to a player throwing a bat is pretty rich indeed. And in pretty poor taste.