UPDATE: My buzz officially killed on that Josh Hamilton-to-Philly thing.

53 Comments

UPDATE:  Well, this is no fun:

 

Much rather would have the intrigue, frankly.

Or maybe it’s a red herring …

[Drop it — ed]

Fine.

1:58 PM: Forgive me for this, but I started watching the BBC series “Sherlock” the other day — I’m on episode five of the six episode run — and it’s pretty much the most amazing thing ever. And affecting. Since I began watching it I can’t meet someone on the street without immediately trying to determine if they have a suntan just below their collar, dog hairs on their pants and whether the their shoes are old but still well taken care of.  Put differently: I’m seeing clues and tells and patterns in everything right now and I see no sign of it stopping.

As such, I find this little clue — passed along by Halladay’s Bicepts, who I am not at all prepared to make my Dr. Watson even if he has been helpful these past few days — to be most interesting. A removed page from the Dallas Morning News. Check the URL. Specifically, the “could be done tonight” part:

source:

Hmm.

My abductive reasoning — and Holmes, Darryl Zero and all of my heroes use abductive, rather than deductive reasoning despite what they say — tells me that someone with the Morning News knows something. And had a story about it, however, briefly, before they were required to take it down due to some sourcing formality. Like, say, they weren’t supposed to say anything until 5pm. Or an editor hadn’t signed off.

So maybe — just maybe — Josh Hamilton is going to be a Philly soon. Maybe as early as tonight.  Not quite elementary, but when you eliminate the impossible, etc. etc.

Oh, and the guy who wrote it had chicken salad for lunch, is in an unhappy marriage and recently purchased a blue blazer that is too large for him yet he still wears because despite his weight loss he still sees himself as a 46.

It’s obvious.

Kershaw-Sale anything but a pitcher’s duel

Elsa/Getty Images
1 Comment

World Series Game 1 was billed as a battle of aces, the Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw against Chris Sale of the Red Sox. Between them, they have 14 All-Star Game nominations. Kershaw has won three Cy Young Awards. Sale could his first Cy Young Award this year. Among his 10 seasons with at least 110 innings pitched, Kershaw has never posted a sub-2.92 ERA. Sale has been at 2.90 or below in each of the last two seasons. The two have combined for over 4,000 career strikeouts and both have averaged better than a strikeout per inning over their careers.

And yet Tuesday’s Game 1 was anything but a pitcher’s duel between Kershaw and Sale. Though a couple of fielding mistakes weren’t of any help to Kershaw in the first inning, Red Sox batters were squaring him up good. Of the five balls put in play in the first inning, three had exit velocities of 100 MPH or higher. Of the 12 total balls put in play against him overall, five reached triple digits in exit velo.

Kershaw gave up a pair of runs in the first, another run in the third on a J.D. Martinez double to straightaway center field, and another two in the fifth. Kershaw led off the fifth by walking Mookie Betts, then giving up a single to Andrew Benintendi, ending his night. Ryan Madson relieved Kershaw and proceeded to allow both inherited runners to score. All told, Kershaw yielded five runs on seven hits and three walks with five strikeouts on 79 pitches in four-plus innings.

Sale, meanwhile, was on the hook for individual runs in the second, third, and fifth. Dodger hitters weren’t squaring him up quite as well as the Red Sox batters squared up Kershaw, but Sale was still more hittable than usual. Of the eight balls put in play against him, four were at least 90 MPH in exit velo. One of the runs was a no-doubt solo home run to Matt Kemp in the second. The Dodgers chased Sale in the fifth when he issued a leadoff walk to Brian Dozier. Matt Barnes relieved him allowed the inherited runner to score. Overall, Sale threw 91 pitches in four-plus innings, serving up three runs on five hits and two walks with seven strikeouts.

The game is now, as has been generally the case throughout this postseason, a battle of the bullpens.