“This season?” “Last season?” “Next season?” What season is it?

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A tweet from my friend Cee Angi a few minutes ago once again raised the question of how we should refer to the 2012 season and the 2013 season. Specifically, when does the former cease being “this season and become “last season” and when does the latter cease being “next season” and become “this season.” And, for that matter, what in the hell do we call where we are right now?

I tackled this two years ago. But to review my stance on it, with the proviso that I am not in favor of us ever having a time when there is no “this season” because that is truly sad:

  •  I will not be subject to the tyranny of the calendar. January 1st is a non-starter for switching from “this season” to “last season” as far as I’m concerned, as it has no organic relationship to baseball, which has its own calendar that can be easily navigated without reference to the names of the months (“October” being the only possible exception).
  • Opening Day is far too late for me for the change. We are way, way too invested in actual on-the-field activity before then.
  • Pitchers and catchers reporting is too late too, because everyone is well into thinking about the upcoming season for that.

So figure it out, everyone. I’m probably just gonna make it up each time I write something anyway.

Wanna see Yasiel Puig and Dallas Keuchel naked?

Associated Press
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On the one hand, the ESPN Magazine “Body Issue” is a transparent attempt by ESPN to sell magazines via the objectification of the human form in a time of the year when only one major team sport — the one ESPN seems to care about the least, baseball — is active and people are generally not buying a ton of magazines.

On the other hand, unlike “Sports Illustrated’s” swimsuit issue, ESPN objectifies men as well as women, at least making things putatively fair. Oh, and they also, on occasion, put people like Prince Fielder in the thing so as to not exclusively promote unrealistic body standards.

So, on balance: not great and still cynical, but it’s better than its antecedent, and I suppose that’s not nothing.

If you can make your way through the moral and ethical implications of all of this unscathed, feel free to gawk at Yasiel Puig and Dallas Keuchel naked. Here is the link to Puig’s spread, here is the link to Keuchel’s. For what it’s worth, Puig looks like he’s having more fun. Shocker.

A taste, from Puig’s Twitter feed:

Keuchel didn’t tweet out pics of himself in the all together. Like I said: he didn’t seem to have quite as much fun with it.