Andrew Cashner injures right thumb in hunting accident, needs three-month recovery

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Rough offseason development here for San Diego.

According to MLB.com’s Corey Brock, starter Andrew Cashner suffered a puncture wound to his right thumb when a friend sliced him with a knife while the two were dressing meat during a recent hunting trip. He had surgery to repair a lacerated tendon and needs three months of recovery time.

The Padres are optimistic that Cashner will be back to full health for the start of the 2013 regular season, but his three-month recovery brushes right up against the start of spring training so it’s far from a certainty.

Cashner, one of the hardest throwers in baseball, registered a 4.27 ERA, 1.32 WHIP and 52/19 K/BB ratio across 46 1/3 innings this past season for San Diego. A lat strain cost him about two months.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.