Yankees could receive insurance funds if Alex Rodriguez can’t play

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So, the best thing A-Rod can do for the Yankees now is not play?

CBSSports.com’s Jon Heyman reports that the Yankees have insurance on Alex Rodriguez’s contract that would cover 75-80 percent of his salary if he proves unable to play due to injuries.

Rodriguez is currently expected to miss 4-6 months following hip surgery in January, potentially leaving him sidelined until June or July.

The way insurance on baseball contracts typically works is that it doesn’t kick in unless a player misses the entire season. Whether that’s the case here is unknown, but it’s a pretty good case there won’t be any immediate windfall for the team.

Rodriguez is signed for five more seasons at a total of $114 million. If his body continues to break down, then perhaps the Yankees will recover big portions of his salary in future years. It might also have luxury-tax ramifications. Technically, A-Rod’s salary would still count against the tax even if he were injured and insurance was covering it, but if the Yankees dropped him from the 40-man roster, it no longer would.

That’s what happened with disappointing import Kei Igawa before his contract expired. Since he was no longer on the 40-man, his salary didn’t figure in for tax purposes. However, the Yankees also couldn’t pay someone to take him — which would have had luxury tax ramifications — and they essentially held him hostage in the minors until his contract was up.

Gio González exits NLCS Game 4 start after twisting ankle

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Brewers starter Gio González was forced to exit his NLCS Game 4 start against the Dodgers in the second inning after twisting his left ankle attempting to field a comebacker hit by Yasiel Puig. González leaped, deflected the ball and twisted his ankle landing, then went after the ball but Puig reached base easily.

The Brewers’ trainer and manager Craig Counsell came out to the mound to observe González throwing some practice pitches. He was clearly in pain but was allowed to stay in. He threw one pitch to Austin Barnes and very visibly grimaced after completing his wind-up. Counsell came back out to the mound and took a visibly upset González out of the game. Freddy Peralta came in relief to finish out the at-bat. González probably shouldn’t have been allowed to stay in the game in the first place, but sometimes a player’s competitiveness is enough to convince a manager and a trainer.

Upon entering, Peralta issued a walk to Austin Barnes, then got the first out when Rich Hill laid down a mediocre bunt, allowing Peralta to get the lead runner at third base. Peralta struck out Chris Taylor and walked Justin Turner to load the bases with two outs. Dodgers manager Dave Roberts opted to pinch-hit for David Freese with Max Muncy, who struck out looking. Peralta was somehow able to slither out of the jam.

Gonzalez pitched two innings in NLCS Game 1 on Friday. He was quite good after joining the Brewers in a late-August trade with the Nationals, compiling a 2.13 regular season ERA in five starts with his new club. The Brewers will likely provide an update on his status after Tuesday night’s game.