Philip Hersh is gonna stick it to the “druggies”

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If I made up a fake Twitter account in order to parody Hall of Fame voters who oppose PED users being inducted, it wouldn’t be anywhere near as good as the real one run by Philip Hersh of the Chicago Tribune.

He’s an Olympic reporter, by the way. Hasn’t covered baseball since some of you have been born.  But once you get your BBWAA card and hold it for ten years you get a Hall of Fame vote for life. And you can use it any way you want.

Hersh is using it like this:

Which is his prerogative. Just as it’s the BBWAA’s prerogative to allow a person who has covered ice skating, downhill skiing and the like since 1987 to continue to vote on the Hall of Fame while it makes hard-working baseball writers who cover games for a living wait ten years after membership before getting the privilege. Phil Hersh: do your worst. Marc Carig, Adam Kilgore and Zach Levine: wait in line.

But it also must make some of the Hall of Fame voters mad that he treats a process which most of them take seriously as some sort of vindictive lark. And that’s true even if they ultimately get to the same place Hersh does.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.