One Hall of Fame voter is done playing steroids police

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This will be Pete Abraham of the Boston Globe’s third year as a Hall of Fame voter. In year one he decided no suspected steroid users will ever get his vote. In year two he softened his stance, only withholding votes from players who were documented steroid users.  This year, however, he has decided that it’s time to end all of that: PED use will not be a part of his analysis going forward. It will be all about what happened on the field.

Go read his column about his new approach. Note that, in changing his view of the matter, he is in no way endorsing PED use or absolving players of their cheating ways. He’s merely acknowledging that PEDs were a reality of the sport for a long time, that there are limits to what a voter can know, that consistency is important and that, ultimately, it is not the place of a baseball writer to become a judge of character as much as he or she is a judge of baseball prowess.

This is encouraging.

MLB has more evidence against Addison Russell than just his ex-wife’s blog post

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Major League Baseball put Cubs shortstop Addison Russell on administrative leave pursuant to its domestic violence policy the other day. The thought at the time was that the move was made solely because Russell’s ex-wife, Melisa Reidy, had written a blog post reiterating past claims of domestic violence. As Ken Rosenthal reports, however, that’s not all they had:

The post alone would not have been enough for baseball to force Russell off the field under its joint domestic violence policy with the players’ union. The league had additional credible information, according to sources familiar with its investigation.

The league’s investigation includes interviews with Reidy and numerous other witnesses, and with officials gathering additional information since Russell went on leave, sources said.

Reidy’s allegations alone, once assessed by MLB, would likely be enough to warrant Russell a suspension. That there is more out there would seem to make the case against him even stronger. The upshot: I think it’s extraordinarily unlikely that Russell will be back with the Cubs this year.