Cubs spent $400,000 to replace worn out Wrigley Field grass

20 Comments

By the end of the season Wrigley Field’s playing surface was a mess thanks in part to all the non-baseball events it hosted and David Kaplan of CSNChicago.com reports that “the decision was made to completely remove the current field and replace it with all new sod and dirt to bring the field up to a more acceptable level for the players.”

According to Kaplan the total cost was $400,000 and the new surface is “a new blend of dirt and a Kentucky Bluegrass that was trucked in from Colorado.”

It’s basically the same setup the Cardinals installed recently and the Cubs will try to keep the new surface in decent shape by cutting down on the number of non-baseball events.

I realize $400,000 for some grass sounds like a ton of money, but when a couple hundred million dollars worth of professional athletes play on something in front of 40,000 paying customers 81 times per season it actually seems kind of cheap.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

Sara D. Davis/Getty Images
2 Comments

Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.