Aroldis Chapman is going to be a starter for the Reds

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Nothing is official yet, but every indication is that the Reds will move Aroldis Chapman into the rotation after signing Jonathan Broxton to a three-year, $21 million deal to replace him as closer.

John Fay of the Cincinnati Enquirer writes as if it might as well be official, saying “this means Chapman’s going to start” and speculating that the 24-year-old left-hander will be allowed to throw around 180 innings after totaling 72 in 2012.

That’s a big jump, but it’s important to note that Chapman was initially viewed as a starter in the minors before shifting to the bullpen in preparation for his call-up in 2010. That year–which was his first in the United States after defecting from Cuba–he threw a total of 109 innings between Triple-A and the majors.

This year was a mixed bag for young pitchers moving from the bullpen to the rotation, as Chris Sale thrived, Daniel Bard struggled, and Neftali Feliz got injured, but seeing what Chapman can do in a 180-inning role before locking him into a 70-inning role for the rest of his career makes an awful lot of sense.

Dodgers, Reds discussing a Yasiel Puig trade

Yasiel Puig
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Here’s a rumor from yesterday afternoon that sort of fell through the cracks, but it’s fun enough to think about for a few moments: Ken Rosenthal reports that the Dodgers and Reds have had “multiple” trade discussions involving Yasiel Puig.

Puig is a potential trade candidate, either (a) because he’s “disgruntled,” according to Dylan Hernandez of the Los Angeles Times last week; or (b) because the Dodgers want to clear salary and roster spots in order to sign a big-name player, according to Rosenthal here. Many people suspect that the Dodgers are going to make a run at Bryce Harper, for example, and if that’s the case they’d no doubt want to open up right field for him.

It seems questionable that any Reds-Dodgers talks would get a ton of traction, especially given that Rosenthal reports that there’s a possibility of the Dodgers taking on Reds pitcher Homer Bailey and the $28 million he’s still owed in order to get some talent back from the Reds in a trade. That would seem to defeat the purpose of unloading Puig’s salary, but this is the sort of things we all talk about now given that the league has, more or less, a defacto salary cap imposed by the Competitive Balance Tax.