MLB distributes $65 million in postseason shares to players

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MLB announced this year’s postseason shares, distributing $65,363,469.22 to teams that participated in the playoffs.

By winning the World Series the Giants receive 36 percent of that money for a total of $23.5 million and the World Series-losing Tigers will divvy up 24 percent or $15.7 million.

For reaching the LCS the Cardinals and Yankees each get $7.8 million to split and the A’s, Orioles, Nationals, and Reds each get $2.1 million for participating in the LDS. Even the Rangers and Braves get to split up nearly $1 million for making (and losing) the one-game Wild Card playoff.

Each team hands out a different number of “full” and “partial” playoff shares, so the numbers vary, but here are this year’s per-player breakdowns for full shares:

Rangers – $16,999
Braves – $19,609
Athletics – $34,325
Orioles – $34,825
Nationals – $37,045
Reds – $37,865
Yankees – $115,065
Cardinals – $122,558
Tigers – $284,274
Giants – $377,002

In other words, based on the revenue MLB generated during the playoffs the Giants each get a $377,002 bonus for winning the World Series or $92,728 more than the Tigers get for losing the World Series.

Nathan Eovaldi to make 2018 debut for Rays soon

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Rays manager Kevin Cash said that pitcher Nathan Eovaldi will join the starting rotation on Monday or Tuesday to face the Athletics, Marc Topkin of the Tampa Bay Times reports. Eovaldi’s rehab outing with Triple-A Durham went well, even though he gave up eight runs in four innings.

Eovaldi, 28, hasn’t pitched in the majors since 2016 after undergoing Tommy John surgery. He had arthroscopic surgery in March to remove loose bodies in his elbow. It’s been a long road back. Knowing Eovaldi needed to recover from surgery, the Rays signed him to a one-year, $2 million contract in 2017 that included a $2 million club option for 2018 that they exercised last November.

When Eovaldi last pitched, he ranked among baseball’s hardest throwers, particularly among starters. He averaged 97.1 MPH on his fastball in 2016. Among starters who racked up at least 100 innings that season, only the Mets’ Noah Syndergaard had a higher average velocity (97.9 MPH). It remains to be seen if he still has that velocity after undergoing two procedures on his elbow.

The Rays will be glad to have Eovaldi back. The club has sustained injuries to Jake Faria, Yonny Chirinos, and Jose De Leon.