And now the Yankees wait for Andy Pettitte

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With Hiroki Kuroda in the fold, the Yankees rotation looks like this: CC Sabathia, Kuroda, Phil Hughes, Ivan Nova and David Phelps.  That’ll play, but they really want one more guy. And that guy is presumably mulling it over with his turkey and gravy:

The Andy Pettitte waiting game continues. Pettitte is spending Thanksgiving week with his family at their ranch, making it unlikely that the lefthander will deliver his decision on his baseball future by Thanksgiving.

It’s not that suspenseful a wait, though. For remember his comments during the ALDS when he said that he didn’t feel like a 75-inning 2012 season “scratched the itch” he had when he decided to come back early this year.  And if he does come back the Yankees are adding a guy who posted a 2.87 ERA and 69/21 K/BB ratio in those 75 innings.

It’s fashionable to hate on the Yankees after their poor ALCS performance, the Blue Jays making a big splash and all of that. But having Pettitte for a hundred more innings than they had him in 2012 will improve a Yankees team that already had baseball’s the American League’s best record.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

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Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.