When will people stop asking “what would George do?”

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George Steinbrenner has been dead since 2010. While obviously still active, he ceded real day-to-day control of the team to Gene Michael and others following his reinstatement in the early 1990s. He stopped having any substantive role of the New York Yankees at least by 2006, and probably earlier than that due to declining health. Since George stopped being the defacto general manager the team has won five World Series titles, seven pennants, has made the playoffs seventeen times and won thousands of games.

Nevertheless, this was Joel Sherman’s column in yesterday’s New York Post:

source:

Since George Steinbrenner stopped being the George Steinbrenner of legend and lore, the Yankees have experienced astounding success, both as a baseball team and as a business. Their run has rivaled the greatest runs in the Yankees’ storied history. It is not hyperbole to say that since the team’s repudiation of George Steinbrenner’s 1970s and 1980s managerial style, they have resumed their role as the gold standard for a professionally-run baseball franchise.

In light of that, why would anyone find it at all reasonable or useful to frame a story about the future of the New York Yankees in “what would George do?” style?  It seems just as relevant to ask what would Ed Barrow do, or what would Larry MacPhail do.

Bradley Zimmer to miss 8-12 months after shoulder surgery

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Indians outfielder Bradley Zimmer is out for the year after undergoing arthroscopic surgery on his right shoulder, the team announced Saturday. The projected recovery timetable spans anywhere from 8-12 months, which puts Zimmer’s return in the second half of the 2019 season, assuming that all goes well.

Zimmer, 25, had not made an appearance for the Indians since June 3. He racked up a cumulative nine weeks on the major- and minor-league disabled lists this season and will have finished his year with a .226/.281/.330 batting line, seven extra-base hits, and four stolen bases in 114 plate appearances.

The outfielder reportedly sustained his season-ending injury during a workout in Triple-A Columbus, where Cleveland.com’s Joe Noga says Zimmer began feeling discomfort in his shoulder after completing a set of one-handed throwing drills. Comments from club manager Terry Francona suggest that the Indians have every reason to believe that he’ll make a full recovery by next summer, though it’s not yet clear whether or not he’ll need additional time to readjust to a full workload when he takes the field again.