Tony La Russa turns to Kickstarter for new phone-based baseball sim

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At least, it sounds like it will be a sim.

Tony La Russa’s Baseball with Fans” is the concept being pitched by Don Daglow, whose design credits include Intellivision World Series Baseball and Earl Weaver Baseball from the 1980’s, the Tony La Russa Baseball series from the 1990’s and the RPG Neverwinter Nights in the 2000’s.

The game is being planned for the iOS and Android platforms. And here’s the pitch:

A new kind of Baseball game that lets you challenge your friends to see who really knows how to handle those tough calls in the dugout.

An interface and design created “from the ground up” just for touchscreens, not re-purposed from existing mouse or console systems.

On-field play that’s based on a physics-driven 3D engine, but displayed in a way that makes the action easy to follow on a smartphone screen.

A single-player option that lets you prove your managerial prowess by challenging Tony La Russa, with AI that Tony himself designed.

A game that kids and casual baseball fans can play and enjoy, but that offers depth and subtlety for sophisticated Baseball experts.

Stat and roster displays designed for fans, not CPA’s, with more detailed data a tap away.

A game that includes links to exclusive video coaching sessions where Tony shares his philosophy and experience from over 30 years as a big league manager.

So, it’s a game for everybody that is going to appeal to, well, who exactly? Will there be any touchscreen bat-swinging at all? A modern-day Earl Weaver Baseball would be neat, but that doesn’t seem likely. A lightweight OOTP hardly seems appealing when the real thing has gone mobile. It’s being marketed to families, but it has a 68-year-old curmudgeon on the “cover.” And there’s a little shot at any statheads who may want to try it.

Still, while skepticism seems warranted, it does have a baseball-design legend behind it. It will be interesting to see what Daglow comes up with if the prospect is funded.

As things stand now, there’s still a ways to go. The Kickstarter, which was posted earlier this afternoon, has received $1,180 in pledges toward a $249,000 goal at the time of this writing.

Matt Carpenter hit a standup bunt double

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The wave of defensive shifts we’ve seen over the past few years has led to a lot of armchair hitting coaches demanding that players bunt to beat it. This is easier said than done, however.

The shift happens because certain hitters tend to pull the ball. Certain hitters tend to pull the ball because pulling the ball is what happens when one gets a strong, quick swing on a pitch one identifies early and which one endeavors to send as far away from home plate as possible. Which is to say that pulling is a skill that is good to have and which is strongly selected for among hitters.

In light of that, “why not just bunt to beat the shift” takes are kind of lazy. Bunting is hard! And it is not a thing guys who get shifted a lot are good at. Most of the time asking a player to do a thing he is not well-equipped to do is a bad idea. Indeed, a hitter voluntarily going away from his strength is something the defense would much prefer.

Most of the time anyway.

Last night Matt Carpenter made those armchair hitting coaches happy by laying down a bunt to beat the shift. And he laid it down so well that he ended up with a standup double:

One batter later Carpenter scored on a Starlin Castro error.

The shift giveth and the shift taketh away.