NBC SportsTalk: Should Bud Selig block the Marlins-Blue Jays trade?

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I’ve seen some random writing on the Internet and heard some random chatter on talk radio about the possibility of Bud Selig stepping in and blocking the Marlins-Blue Jays trade on some “best interests of baseball” grounds. But let’s be clear about this: he won’t do it, and he probably shouldn’t.

Let’s take the “shouldn’t” first: He shouldn’t because there are situations where a trade that looks exactly like this one from a baseball perspective — a massive payroll dump for some young cheap talent — is legitimate for a team that wants to jump-start a rebuilding project. If you have expensive veterans and you’re not going anyplace, the best way to deal with it is to get rid of the expensive veterans. Cut ’em if you have no other choice, but if you can get a return for them, go for it, start fresh and move on.

The thing that makes this particular trade odious cannot be seen on the paper setting forth the terms of the transaction. The deal itself is not so unorthodox or insane that it requires intervention.  Rather, it is the background of Jeff Loria and the Marlins and the b.s. and baloney he has dumped on Marlins fans and the city of Miami for a decade that makes this all so vile, and that’s all outside of the terms of the deal.

That leads to the reason why Bud Selig won’t block this trade, even if there were other good reasons to do it.  He won’t do it because Selig stepping into this mess would represent rank hypocrisy.  Baseball rewarded Loria for killing a franchise in Montreal. Baseball for years allowed Loria to pocket revenue sharing money rather than use it on his team to make them better and, if their financial documents hadn’t been leaked to Deadspin, likely still would allow it.  Baseball has strongly encouraged owners to blackmail cities into building them publicly-funded stadiums. Indeed, it has actively discouraged efforts by owners to pay for their own ballparks.

Baseball will not block or, I presume, even criticize this trade because it is the logical product of the incentive system it itself has created. The way Loria has built up hope, taken taxpayer money and then trashed his team and crapped on his fan base may be rather extreme and possibly even disturbing for the people in the Commissioner’s Office, but given the way Loria has been incentivized for the past 10-15 years, it should not be shocking to them.  And for Major League Baseball to now, after all of this time, step in and object to the way Jeff Loria is mismanaging his franchise, would be a repudiation of policies that it has long encouraged among the ownership class, and if there is one thing that Bud Selig doesn’t do it’s reverse himself when it comes to this kind of stuff.

I was on NBC SportsTalk with Erik Kuselias last night and we talked about this a bit:

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Comerica Park concession worker arrested after video emerges of him spitting in food

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Over the weekend an Instagram post emerged of a concession worker at Comerica Park in Detroit spitting on pizza crust before covering it with sauce and then, presumably, serving it to a customer. It’s pretty gross, so you probably don’t want to see it. But if you just can’t help yourself, here you go.

If you DO NOT want to go to that link, know that the employee was identified and arrested and could face charges. He has also been fired and Detroit Sportservice, the concession company which runs things at Comerica, shut down that stand. The guy who took the video was suspended for an unrelated uniform violation. There’s a minor dustup emerging between him and the company, as he claims that he tried to tell people about the spitting coworker and was ignored, but the story makes that seem fairly implausible. It sounds to me anyway like the concession company handled it about as well as they could under the circumstances.

In other news, many ballparks allow you to bring in your own food subject to certain restrictions. I can’t say I’ve ever had a bad experience with ballpark food, but if that sort of thing worries you, perhaps you should investigate the rules for brown-bagging it in to the old ball game.