Matt Holliday on Matt Cain plunking him in the NLCS: “it was less than tough”

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So much arguing about awards and trades and things today. Let’s go back to some baseball. Specifically, Game 1 of the NLCS when Matt Holliday took out Marco Scutaro at second base with a sketchy-at-best slide.

Holliday admitted at the time he made a bad slide and denied any attempt to hurt Scutaro. In Game 7, however, Matt Cain plunked him.  Tim McKernan of InsideStl.com interviewed Holliday about it, and Holliday took issue with the timing of it:

The Cat: If he would’ve plunked you right after would you have taken it as part of the game and part of the medicine that you had to take? Would you say, that that would’ve gone down easier?

Matt: If you’re going to do it, I think that is when you do it. I wouldn’t be happy about it anytime. I just thought that in the situation that it actually did happen it was less than tough.

Is Jim Leyland the last guy in baseball who still uses the tried-and-true “horses–t” when talking about violations of the unwritten rules? I’ve always loved “horses–t.”  It’s perfect. “Less than tough?”  Just not feeling it.

Cody Bellinger named NLCS MVP

Cody Bellinger
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Following a dominant 5-1 win to clinch the National League Championship Series on Saturday night, the Dodgers named outfielder Cody Bellinger their MVP of the series.

Bellinger, 23, made noise when it mattered. Entering Saturday’s game, he carried a meager .190/.227/.238 batting line with just four hits and two RBI, but his hits in Games 4 and 7 became the difference-makers the Dodgers needed to keep pace with the Brewers and clinch the NL pennant. In Game 4, it was Bellinger’s 13th-inning base hit off of Junior Guerra that put the Dodgers over the top for the walk-off 2-1 win. The outfielder returned to put the finishing touches on the series with a go-ahead home run — his first of the postseason — in the second inning of Game 7.

Bellinger wrapped his second season in the Dodgers’ organization in 2018, slashing .260/.343/.470 with 25 home runs, an .814 OPS, and 3.6 fWAR across 632 PA and all 162 games. He’s the youngest Dodgers player to receive the award to date.