David Price becomes first Rays pitcher to win Cy Young Award

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After tying for the league lead in wins and finishing first in ERA, David Price claimed his first American League Cy Young Award on Wednesday, picking up 14 of the 28 first-place votes.

Justin Verlander, last year’s Cy Young and MVP winner, finished second with 13 first-place votes and totaled 149 points to Price’s 153. Jered Weaver came in third, though he didn’t get the remaining first-place vote. That went to Rays closer Fernando Rodney, courtesy of Drew Davison of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.

The four-point margin of victory was the closest in an AL Cy Young race since Mike Cuellar and Denny McLain tied for the award in 1969.

Price tied Weaver at 20 wins and ended the year with a 2.56 ERA, just ahead of Verlander at 2.64. Weaver, at 2.81, was the only other AL starter to finish with a sub-3.00 ERA.

Verlander received less run support than Price and ended up at 17 wins. Still, many will argue that he should have won the award. He led the AL in innings pitched and strikeouts. He threw 27 more innings than Price and 50 more innings than Weaver. He also was pitching in front of the worst defense of the trio and in the most favorable park for hitters. On the other hand, he did pitch in the weakest of the AL’s three divisions.

Price previously finished second in the Cy Young balloting to Felix Hernandez in 2010. The three-time All-Star is 61-31 with a 3.16 ERA since debuting with the Rays at the end of the 2008 season.

Report: Six teams are in on Troy Tulowitzki

Troy Tulowitzki
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At least six teams are interested in free agent shortstop Troy Tulowitzki, according to a recent report from Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle. Known suitors include the Cubs, who will reportedly be in attendance during one of the shortstop’s offseason workouts as they decide whether or not to press forward with a deal.

The Blue Jays released Tulowitzki on Tuesday as general manager Ross Atkins admitted he couldn’t rely on the 34-year-old to bounce back from season-ending bone spur removal surgery and be the kind of consistent presence the club needed going forward. Toronto is expected to absorb the remaining $38 million on Tulowitzki’s contract, which includes the $20 million he’s due in 2019, another $14 million in 2020 and a $4 million buyout in 2021.

The veteran slugger will be available to any interested team at a minimum $600,000, an undeniably attractive bargain if he recovers in advance of the 2019 season. He last appeared in the majors in 2017 and slashed .249/.300/.378 with 17 extra-base hits and a .678 OPS through 260 PA. Per Slusser, Tulowitzki appears to be angling for a job with the Athletics — even going so far as to say he’d be willing to switch positions in order to play for a winning team — though they have yet to reach out about a potential deal this winter.