Scott Boras says that the Indians owners don’t care about winning

40 Comments

Well, he essentially does.  I’m going to warn you, this may be the most convoluted bit of bad lawyerspeak you’ll read this year, but the upshot is clearly Boras saying that the Indians have not demonstrated that they really want to win baseball games.

Paul Hoynes of the Cleveland Plain Dealer quotes Boras, who was responding to a question about whether his client Shin-Soo Choo would be traded this winter:

“Choo’s let it be known that he has a desire to win. I think the ownership in Cleveland, foundationally, they’re going to have to illustrate some dynamics with new revenues and where they stand about what they do to show their fan base and their players who they are in competing.  That’s a new calling that they are going to have to bring forth to give players, and everybody involved, (an idea) about what their intentions are in their ownership.”

It may be convoluted English, but there’s no mistaking that he’s saying that the Indians don’t give a crap about competing.

Now, to be fair, Boras’ definition of competing is almost indistinguishable from “spending lots of money on Boras clients,” but he does have a point about the Indians needing to better declare their intentions.  Tribe fans I know have no clue from year to year what ownership’s plans are. In light of that, it’s hard to look at the team’s fixation on cost-cutting and not conclude that profitability is paramount.

Report: White Sox acquire Yonder Alonso from Indians

Yonder Alonso
Getty Images
Leave a comment

The White Sox have reportedly picked up first baseman Yonder Alonso from the Indians, according to Stadium. The return for Alonso is expected to be nothing more flashy than a “fringe prospect,” though the minutiae of the deal is still pending a formal announcement from both teams.

Alonso, 31, inked a two-year deal with the Indians during the 2017 offseason. His first campaign with the club yielded a modest .250/.317/.421 batting line, 23 home runs, .738 OPS and 0.7 fWAR in 574 PA. The real boon for the White Sox may not be a passable veteran bat, however, but something more intangible — like Alonso’s clout with his brother-in-law and highly-coveted free agent slugger, Manny Machado.

While Alonso’s 2018 output represented a significant decline from the career-best numbers he posted in 2017, he’s still a solid contributor at the plate and, more importantly, slated to remain under team control for the next two years with just $8 million owed in 2019 and a $9 million option in 2020. As MLB.com’s Anthony Castrovince notes, the $17 million the Indians just erased from their payroll should give them enough room to accommodate the contracts for right-handers Trevor Bauer and Corey Kluber — a bonus regardless of what they happen to get in the trade.