Angel Pagan at “the top of the Braves wish list”

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I saw this rumor at the paddock before the second race, outside the men’s room when I placed my bet. I saw this rumor before it even got up this morning:

The Braves are exploring other options via free agency – San Francisco’s Angel Pagan probably tops that short list — or through a trade.

That’s David O’Brien of the AJC, who notes that the top trade target is Denard Span of the Twins, who he and others believe can be had for a starting pitcher. And the Braves do have a handful of starting pitchers in their system.

Pagan, who is 31, hit .288/.338/.440 with eight homers and 29 steals last year for the Giants. The Giants, however, are likely to want him back, and several other teams are likely to be in on that action as well.

Span is going to be 29 next year. He’s certainly not the hitter that Pagan is, but he’s also under team control for three more years at a decent price: $4.75 million in 2013, $6.5 million in 2014 and a $9 million team option for 2015.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.