When it comes to performance enhancing drugs, Romney beats Obama

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Because the election season hasn’t been long or tortuous enough, Mitt Romney and President Obama were interviewed by Chris Berman on Monday Night Football last night. Which seems like a waste of time, because if you’re still an undecided voter on the evening of November 5 you’re probably unlikely to have the proper cognitive skills to operate your car to get you to the polls this morning anyway. But hey, they talked about sports, so that’s fun.

I don’t really care what Obama thinks about the Chicago Bears or the college football playoff thing, and I don’t really care what Romney thinks of the Red Sox and Patriots. We all have our rah-rahs. But this answer from Romney about what he thinks is the biggest issue in sports was interesting:

“It has to be the specter of drugs — and performance enhancing drugs of all kinds,” he said. “We have to continue to battle that. We have to make sure that our technology keeps up with the people that are trying to skirt around the law. … We’re going to have to change the culture that says to people, using performance enhancing drugs is acceptable. It is simply not.”

Obama didn’t touch that last night, but in October 2008, as a challenger, he sure did during a radio appearance:

“As a father and an avid sports fan, I understand the dangers that performance enhancing drugs pose for athletes, as well as the teenagers who seek to emulate them, not to mention the effect that these drugs have on the integrity of sports. As president, I would use the bully pulpit of my office to warn Americans about the dangers of performance enhancing drugs, and I would put greater resources into enforcement of existing drug laws. I would also convene a summit of the commissioners of the professional sports leagues, as well as university presidents, to explore options for decreasing the use of these drugs.”

Greater resources into enforcement? Thanks, dude. While it isn’t of extreme importance compared to most of what happens in government, the DOJ’s show trials of PED users is one of the dumbest and more pointless things the government has done in the past four years.

I’m gonna vote later today and based on stuff I’ve written before you probably know how I’m gonna vote. But I will freely admit that I would much prefer it if the government’s involvement in sports controversies was more akin to Romney’s “working to change the culture” talk than Obama’s “putting greater resources into enforcement” jazz.  Government has enough to do without increasing the intensity of its increasingly feckless war on drugs,* let alone the singularly feckless PED battles within that war.

*No, I’m not under any delusion that Romney would ratchet back the overall war on drugs anymore than Obama would. When it comes to that stuff the major parties seem to be in similar, idiotic lockstep.

Brewers reliever Josh Hader in hot water over racist, homophobic tweets from 2011-12

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Brewers reliever Josh Hader didn’t have a good night. He gave up four hits and a three-run homer to put the National League in a big hole in the All-Star Game. That’s the kind of thing that has to stick with you.

Oh, and he was also revealed to be a SUPER BIG racist, misogynist and homophobe. That’s gonna stick with him too, and may land him in trouble with Major League Baseball.

Someone decided to dig through Hader’s Twitter history this evening and when they did they found some ugly, ugly stuff in there from back in 2011-12.* Hader was found to have used the n-word, liberally. He said “I hate gay people.” He said some super misogynistic stuff about wanting a woman who will cook and clean for him, among other pretty damn vile things. There were multiple references to cocaine. He said “I’ll murder your family” to one person and made some total non-sequitur tweet simply saying “KKK.” You name a social media etiquette line that one can cross and Hader not only crossed it, but he totally and gleefully trampled over. If you want to see that vile stuff you can see it over at The Big Lead, which screen-capped it. I presume Hader has deleted them by now.

The news of Hader’s old, unearthed tweets bubbled out as the All-Star Game was going on, and reporters met Hader in the locker room right afterward for comment. Hader owned up to them — there was no “I was hacked” excuses offered here — saying that the tweets were a sign of immaturity when he was 17 years-old. He said he plans to apologize to his teammates, saying they don’t reflect on him as a person now. His quote: “No excuses. I was dumb and stupid.” Which, well, yes, obviously.

That may not be the end of it, however:

These tweets are old, Hader may be a different person now and people can do a lot of growing up between 17 and 24. But Major League Baseball is not happy tonight, I can assure you, that an ugly social media incident blew up during its biggest showcase of the regular season.

Will Hader be disciplined? Hard to say, given that Hader wasn’t even drafted yet when those tweets were made and given that MLB’s social media policy was not even in place then. But it would not shock me at all if more comes of this than Hader merely apologizing to his teammates. Stay tuned.

*There are several putative Hader tweets floating around Twitter right now of a more recent vintage. Hader has locked his account, however, and they cannot be confirmed, and many people who were able to access his account before it was locked said those tweets were not there before, with the suggestion that they were Photoshopped. We are neither in the position to — nor do we have the inclination to — verify which of Hader’s tweets are legitimate and which are fabricated. We know, however, that there is more than ample, awful stuff that he has owned up to and we’ll leave it at that for now.