Dodgers looking to add starting pitching, Zack Greinke and Anibal Sanchez “on their list”

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A potential reunion between the Dodgers and Hiroki Kuroda is one thing, but Jayson Stark of ESPN.com reports that Zack Greinke and Anibal Sanchez are also “on their list” as Los Angeles looks to add starting pitching.

Los Angeles’ payroll is already around $200 million, so making a serious run at Greinke or even Sanchez would more or less say the Dodgers can spend whatever they want at this point.

Beyond that the Dodgers already have veteran starters Clayton Kershaw, Chris Capuano, Aaron Harang, and Josh Beckett, plus Chad Billingsley and Ted Lilly as health question marks.

I’m not sure how Greinke and Sanchez fit into that equation, but given the Dodgers’ recent moves it’s tough to write it off. Which is something we’re probably going to be saying about a lot of Dodgers rumors all offseason.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.