Davey Johnson still doesn’t have a contract with Nationals

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It’s been assumed that Davey Johnson will manage the Nationals in 2013, but Adam Kilgore of the Washington Post reports that the two sides still haven’t agreed to a deal.

Johnson is technically under contract with the Nationals through 2014 as a senior advisor–which is the role he filled before replacing Jim Riggleman as manager in mid-2011–but Kilgore writes that “the language (and salary) of his deal must be altered before his return to the dugout is sealed.”

And that’s where it gets interesting:

Even though it seems likely Johnson will come back, it should necessarily not be taken for granted. Johnson is a prideful man who has parted ways with four teams in the past, often in surprising and acrimonious fashion; in Baltimore, he was forced out on the day he won the Manager of the Year award. In the past, Nationals ownership has shown an unwillingness to pay top dollar for managerial talent.

Johnson has maintained all along that he’s perfectly fine waiting to get the contract settled, but clearly the situation is at least a little more complicated than initially expected.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.