Adam LaRoche, Sean Burnett decline options with Nationals

9 Comments

First baseman Adam LaRoche and reliever Sean Burnett are officially free agents after both players declined their half of mutual options with the Nationals.

LaRoche turned down $10 million and Burnett turned down $3.5 million after the team previously exercised its half of both options.

LaRoche will have no trouble securing a multi-year deal on the open market and may end up re-signing with the Nationals for significantly more than $10 million, so it was an easy call for him.

Burnett seems like less of a sure thing to snag a big multi-year deal considering he dealt with elbow problems in the second half and underwent surgery to remove a bone spur after the season. On the other hand Burnett is a 30-year-old lefty with a 2.81 ERA in 202 innings since joining the Nationals, so he won’t struggle to find work and probably started drooling along with every other reliever when he saw Brandon League’s contract with the Dodgers.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

Getty Images
14 Comments

Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.