Walt Weiss interviewed for the Rockies gig, Matt Williams a candidate too

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I liked Jason Giambi as a player so I was happy to see him as a candidate for the Colorado Rockies managerial job.  But I also like Walt Weiss, so now I am torn. The Denver Post reports:

The idea of becoming a big-league manager never left Walt Weiss. He just put it aside for a time. But now the former shortstop has emerged as a strong candidate to fill the Rockies’ vacant job after interviewing with the club this week.

Weiss spent some time in the Rockies front office after he retired but most recently coached a high school team in the Denver area.

The Post also notes that Diamondbacks third base coach Matt Williams is a candidate as well. Given the Stars of the 1990s kick they seem to be on at the moment, it’s also rumored that the Rockies are going to adopt Everclear’s “Santa Monica” as official team song.

Mariners claim Kaleb Cowart off waivers from Angels

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The Mariners announced that the club claimed Kaleb Cowart off waivers from the Angels. Interestingly, the Mariners list Cowart as both an outfielder and a right-handed pitcher. Cowart has never pitched professionally, but the Mariners will try him as a two-way player next season, Ryan Divish of the Seattle Times reports. Cowart was a highly regarded pitcher in high school.

Cowart, 26, has played all over the field, spending most of his time at third base and second base, but also logging a handful of innings at first base, shortstop, and left field.  He hasn’t hit much at all, owning a career .177/.241/.293 triple-slash line across 380 plate appearances in the big leagues. It makes sense to try another angle.

Shohei Ohtani, of course, is helping to popularize the rebirth of the two-way player. In his first year in the majors after having played in Japan for five years, Ohtani won the AL Rookie of the Year Award by posting a .925 OPS in 367 plate appearances along with a 3.31 ERA over 10 starts. Don’t expect Cowart to hit those lofty numbers, but additional versatility could prolong his life in the majors.