Madison Bumgarner delivers as Giants top Tigers in Game 2, take 2-0 lead in World Series

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Coming into tonight, many questioned whether Madison Bumgarner was the right choice for Game 2 after his late-season struggles carried into the postseason. However, Giants manager Bruce Bochy decided to roll the dice with his young left-hander after some mechanical tweaks rather than go with Ryan Vogelsong on short rest or Tim Lincecum. It was a pretty good call.

Bumgarner delivered seven shutout innings tonight as the Giants topped the Tigers 2-0 in Game 2 to grab a 2-0 lead in the World Series.

This wasn’t a thoroughly dominating performance by Bumgarner, as there were a number of hard-hit balls and some ugly at-bats and baserunning blunders by the Tigers, but he was plenty efficient. Averaging a tick over 89 mph on his fastball, he allowed just two hits and two walks while striking out eight and throwing 54 out of 86 pitches for strikes. This was the first time he had completed seven innings in start since August 20.

The Tigers were held to just two hits all night and they came up empty in their lone scoring threat. Bumgarner hit Prince Fielder with a pitch to begin the top of the second inning before Delmon Young doubled into the left field corner. However, the rally was snuffed out after Fielder was gunned down at home plate on the play. Third base coach Gene Lamont probably wishes he could have that one back.

Doug Fister was excellent for the Tigers, even staying in the game after being hit in the head by a line drive in the second inning, but he just didn’t get any help from his offense. He was pulled in the top of the seventh inning after giving up a leadoff single to Hunter Pence, who eventually scored on a double-play grounder off the bat of Brandon Crawford. Pence later added some insurance with a sacrifice fly in the bottom of the eighth inning. Yes, one day after getting three home runs from Pablo Sandoval, the Giants scored two runs in the ugliest way possible. Still, a win is a win.

The Tigers appeared to have the advantage with the pitching matchups in San Francisco, but they’ll head home down 0-2. The World Series will resume Saturday night in Detroit when Anibal Sanchez starts for the Tigers and Vogelsong pitches for the Giants.

Major League Baseball told Kolten Wong to ditch Hawaii tribute sleeve

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Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Major League Baseball has told Cardinals infielder Kolten Wong that he has to get rid of the colorful arm sleeve he’s been wearing, pictured above, that pays tribute to his native Hawaii and seeks to raise awareness of recovery efforts from the destruction caused by the erupting Mount Kilauea.

Goold:

[Wong] has been notified by Major League Baseball that he will face a fine if he continues to wear an unapproved sleeve that features Hawaiian emblem. Wong said he will stash the sleeve, like Jose Martinez had to do with his Venezuelan-flag sleeve, and find other ways to call attention to his home island.

Willson Contreras was likewise told to ditch his Venezuela sleeve.

None of these guys are being singled out, it seems. Rather, this is all part of a wider sweep Major League Baseball is making with respect to the uniformity of uniforms. As Goold notes at the end of his piece, however, MLB has no problem whatsoever with players wearing a non-uniform article of underclothing as long as it’s from an MLB corporate sponsor. Such as this sleeve worn by Marcell Ozuna, and supplied by Nike that, last I checked, were not in keeping with the traditional St. Louis Cardinals livery:

ST. LOUIS, MO – MAY 22: Marcell Ozuna #23 of the St. Louis Cardinals celebrates after recording his third hit of the game against the Kansas City Royals in the fifth inning at Busch Stadium on May 22, 2018 in St. Louis, Missouri. (Photo by Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images)

If Nike was trying to get people to buy Hawaii or Venezuela compression sleeves, I’m sure there would be no issue here. They’re not, however, and it seems like creating awareness and support for people suffering from natural, political and humanitarian disasters do not impress the powers that be nearly as much.