Jason Motte makes the two-inning save look easy against Giants

5 Comments

Jason Motte had never had a two-inning save before the Cardinals asked him to get six outs in a two-run game after Wednesday’s long rain delay. Not only did he do the job, but he made it a breeze, retiring every Giant he faced as St. Louis won 3-1.

In so doing, Motte became just the second different National League reliever to record a two-inning save in the postseason in the last 10 years. Brad Lidge had three of them for the Astros between the 2004 and ’05 NLCSs, all of them against the Cardinals.

Motte was also the first pitcher since Mariano Rivera in the 2005 ALDS to go six up, six down in a postseason save chance. The last NL reliever to do it was Arizona’s Byung-Hyun Kim in the 2001 NLCS against the Braves.

But that’s all gravy. What the Cardinals care about is that Motte needed just 19 pitches to dispose of the Giants in Game 3, meaning he should be fine to go an inning in Game 4 if the need arises.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

Getty Images
12 Comments

Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.