UPDATE: Olbermann’s Yankees-Marlins A-Rod trade report already shot down

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UPDATE: That was fast:

 

And let’s not forget that A-Rod has a full no-trade clause. If he was going to allow a trade anywhere it may be Miami because he lives there, but really, this makes no sense.

3:15 PM: Take this with a considerably large grain of salt. Because while, yes, Keith Olbermann is a member of the media — formerly a member of the sports media — and while he likely has contacts with the New York Yankees given who he is, where his season tickets are and all of that stuff, this doesn’t seem terribly plausible:

The New York Yankees have held discussions with the Miami Marlins about a trade involving their third baseman in crisis, Alex Rodriguez.

Sources close to both organizations confirm the Yankees would pay all – or virtually all – of the $114,000,000 Rodriguez is owed in a contract that runs through the rest of this season and the next five. One alternative scenario has also been discussed in which the Yankees would pay less of Rodriguez’s salary, but would obtain the  troubled Marlins’ reliever Heath Bell and pay what remains of the three-year, $27,000,000 deal Bell signed last winter.

Not plausible from a baseball perspective — why in the hell would the Yankees want Heath Bell? — but also implausible given the timing of it all. Since when do teams in the freaking playoffs have trade discussions with anyone? Also: Olbermann doesn’t really report baseball news, so I’m not sure why he’d get this sort of thing before anyone else.

It’s not crazy to think that the Yankees will try to shop Rodriguez this winter. But I have a really hard time believing that there is anything to this beyond loose “what if” chatter over the dregs of a bottle of scotch.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.