At least one person in Miami thinks Ozzie Guillen will keep his job

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Two weeks ago Buster Olney of ESPN.com reported that the Marlins were “aggressively seeking a replacement for Ozzie Guillen” and, while Guillen got into a public spat with Olney, we even started speculating about where he might land post-firing.

Everything on the Guillen front has been calm since then and now Clark Spencer of the Miami Herald writes that he expects Guillen to remain the Marlins’ manager next season.

Though I have nothing concrete on which to base this on, it is my belief that as more time passes, the greater the likelihood Guillen keeps his job. Some others I’ve spoken with share the same sense. The rest of the coaching staff is another story, and I would not be surprised to see changes made there. Coaches are under contract only through the end of this month.

Guillen has three years remaining on his contract (to the tune of $7.5 million) and ditching him after one season might raise more questions about Loria’s acumen in hiring managers than it would Guillen’s ability to successfully manage a team. It becomes much more an indictment of Loria than it does of Guillen.

That sounds about right. Jeffrey Loria has gone through a ton of managers over the years, less than 12 months ago he thought Guillen was worth a four-year, $10 million commitment, and it’s not like Guillen’s behavior this season should have come as a huge shock to anyone who was paying attention during his eight years with the White Sox.

Baseball seeking a second lab for MLB COVID-19 tests

MLB COVID-19 tests
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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reported last night that Major League Baseball is “actively pursuing an additional medical lab site to increase the speed and efficiency” of MLB COVID-19 tests.

The current setup — as planned by MLB and approved by the MLBPA as a part of the plan to play the 2020 season — is for all MLB COVID-19 tests to be sent to and processed by MLB’s PED testing lab in Salt Lake City, Utah. As you likely heard, there have been delays in the administration of COVID-19 tests and in the shipping of tests to Utah, but to date no one has reported that the lab itself has not been able to handle the tests once they’ve arrived there. If MLB is looking for a second lab site a week into this process, it suggests that their plans for the Utah lab might not be working the way they had anticipated.

The issues with testing have created unease around the game in recent days, with some players and team executives speaking out against Major League Baseball’s handling of the plan in the early going. Commissioner Rob Manfred, meanwhile, has responded defensively to the criticism.

Meanwhile, the New York Times reported this morning that, months into the COVID-19 pandemic, the United States still lacks testing capacity. From the report:

Lines for coronavirus tests have stretched around city blocks and tests ran out altogether in at least one site on Monday, new evidence that the country is still struggling to create a sufficient testing system months into its battle with Covid-19 . . .“It’s terrifying, and clearly an evidence of a failure of the system,” said Dr. Morgan Katz, an infectious disease expert at Johns Hopkins Hospital . . . in recent weeks, as cases have surged in many states, the demand for testing has soared, surpassing capacity and creating a new testing crisis.

It’s less than obvious, to say the least, how Major League Baseball plans to expand capacity for MLB COVID-19 tests while America as a whole is experiencing “a new testing crisis” and a “failure of the system.” At the very least it’s less than obvious how, even if Major League Baseball can do so, it can do so ethically.