Alex Rodriguez takes seat again, yet Curtis Granderson is even worse

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Alex Rodriguez was removed for a pinch-hitter for the second straight game Thursday and rightfully so. Yet A-Rod hasn’t been the Yankees’ worst performer through four postseason games. That title goes to Curtis Granderson.

Granderson went 0-for-5 with three more strikeouts in Thursday’s loss to the Orioles. He’s 1-for-16 with nine strikeouts in the series, with his lone hit being a single. A-Rod is 2-for-16 after collecting himself a single tonight, giving him merely the third worst average in the lineup. Robinson Cano is just 2-for-18, though he at least has three RBI to his credit. Both of his hits have been doubles.

For all of his homers — and he hit 43 of them — Granderson wasn’t a particularly good hitter for the Yankees this year after his hot start. He came in at .196 in August and .178 in September before padding his numbers a bit in the three-game sweep of the Red Sox to close the season (he went 6-for-13 with three homers). If not for that series, his 40-homer season could have been considered the worst ever.

If there was ever a time for Granderson to bust out again, it’d be Friday’s Game 5. He hits quite a bit better at home, and he’ll be facing a right-hander in Jason Hammel. Any time he hits a fly to right in Yankee Stadium, it’s a threat to leave the yard.

But to do that, he’s going to have to make some contact. With those nine strikeouts in 16 plate appearances, even Mark Reynolds is feeling bad for him right now.

Twins designate Phil Hughes for assignment

AP Photo/Ron Schwane
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Phil Hughes was officially designated for assignment by the Twins on Tuesday, the culmination of multiple injury-plagued seasons and poor performance.

Things couldn’t have started out much better for Hughes in Minnesota. The former Yankees hurler joined the Twins on a three-year, $24 million contract in December of 2013 and reeled off a 3.52 ERA over 32 starts during his first season with the club. He set the MLB record (which still stands, by the way) for single season strikeout-to-walk ratio and even received some downballot Cy Young Award consideration. The big year resulted in the two sides ripping up their previous agreement with a new five-year, $58 million deal, but it was all downhill after that.

Hughes took a step back with a 4.40 ERA in 2015 and struggled with a 5.95 ERA over 11 starts and one relief appearance in 2016 before undergoing surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome. He wasn’t any better upon his return last year, putting up a 5.87 ERA in nine starts and five relief appearances. Hughes missed time with a biceps issue and required a thoracic outlet revision surgery in August. He began this year on the disabled list with an oblique injury, only to put up a 6.75 ERA over two starts and five relief appearances before the Twins decided to turn the page this week.

Hughes is still owed the remainder of his $13.2 million salary for this year and another $13.2 million next year. The deal didn’t work out as anyone would have hoped, but unfortunately this is another case of health just not cooperating.