Giants break through in 10th inning of NLDS Game 3 against Reds to avoid elimination

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Scott Rolen ranks among the best defensive third basemen in major league history and catcher Ryan Hanigan had a fantastic season behind the plate.

But baseball can be an incredibly cruel sport.

Hanigan let a Jonathan Broxton pitch get to the backstop with two outs in the top of the 10th inning, allowing Buster Posey to advance to third base and Hunter Pence to scoot over to second. And then Rolen bobbled what looked like a routine grounder off the bat of Joaquin Arias, allowing Posey to cross the plate for the go-ahead run. It was the Giants’ first lead of this five-game division series, and they’d hold onto it tightly.

Sergio Romo shut the Reds down in the bottom half of the 10th as San Francisco picked up a nail-biting 2-1 win and managed to avoid a sweep in Game 3 of the NLDS on Tuesday night at Great American Ball Park.

The extra-inning loss spoiled a dominant effort by Reds starter Homer Bailey, who matched a career high with 10 strikeouts and carried a no-hitter into the sixth inning. He wound up allowing just one run on one hit.

Game 4 on Wednesday will feature either Mike Leake or Mat Latos against San Francisco’s Barry Zito.

Police are keeping reporters away from owners at the owners meetings

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The owners meetings are going on in Arlington, Texas right now and something unusual is happening: the owners are using police to shield them from reporters seeking comment.

Chandler Rome, the Astros beat writer for the Houston Chronicle, attempted to talk to Astros owner Jim Crane at the hotel in which the meetings are taking place. Which makes sense because, duh, Rome covers the Astros and, if you haven’t noticed, the Astros are in the news lately.

Here’s how it went:

This was confirmed by other reporters:

To be clear: this is a radically different way things have ever been handled at MLB meetings of any kind. Reporters — who are credentialed specifically for these meetings at this location, they’re not just showing up — approach the GMs or the owners or whoever as they walk in the public parts of the hotel in which they’re held or in the areas designated for press conferences. It’s not contentious. Usually the figures of interest will stop and talk a bit then move on. If they don’t want to talk they just keep walking, often offering apologies or an excuse about being late for something and say they’ll be available later. It’s chill as far as reporters vs. the powerful tend to go.

But apparently not today. Not at the owners meetings. Now police — who are apparently off duty on contract security, but armed and in full official uniform — are shielding The Lords of Baseball from scrutiny.

We live in interesting times.