Brett Anderson on A’s roster for ALDS following oblique injury

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The Athletics have officially announced their roster for their series against the Tigers in the ALDS, which will begin tonight in Detroit. No big surprises in here, but Casey Pratt of CSNBayArea.com passes along word that Brett Anderson is indeed on the roster after straining his oblique during a start in Detroit on September 19.

Jarrod Parker and Tommy Milone will start the first two games of the series, but Anderson is currently lined up to start Game 3 on Tuesday in Oakland. A.J. Griffin is the probable starter for Game 4.

Anderson spent most of this year rehabbing from Tommy John surgery, so he didn’t make his season debut with the A’s until August 21. The 24-year-old southpaw had a 2.57 ERA and 25/7 K/BB ratio in 35 innings across six starts prior to the oblique injury.

The A’s have 12 pitchers and 13 position players on their roster. Athletics manager Bob Melvin has elected to carry left-handers Travis Blackley, Jerry Blevins and Pedro Figueroa in his bullpen. Blackley will function as a long-man, but Figueroa offers a second lefty for possible matchups against Prince Fielder and Alex Avila. As Aaron mentioned yesterday, right-hander Pat Neshek is active after his son died less than 24 hours after being born earlier this week.

Barry Zito rooted against his own team in the 2010 World Series

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Retired big league pitcher Barry Zito has a memoir coming out. Much of it will likely track the usual course of an athlete’s memoir. The thrill of victory, the agony of defeat and a few fun and/or sad and/or thoughtful anecdotes along the way. One bit of it, though, is not the stuff of the usual athlete memoir.

He writes that he ctually rooted against the San Francisco Giants — his own team —  in the 2010 World Series. He did so because he was left off the postseason roster, felt miserable about it and let his ego consume him. From the San Francisco Chronicle:

“It was really hard to admit . . . I rooted against the team because my ego was in full control and if we lost then I could get out of there . . . It would a) prove they couldn’t do it without me, and b) take me out of the situation because I was so miserable coming to the field every day. I was so deep in shame. I wanted out of that situation so bad.”

Zito at that point was midway through a seven-year, $126 million contract he signed with the Giants after the 2006 season. Almost as soon as he signed it he transformed from one of the better pitchers in the game — he had a 124 ERA+ in eight seasons with the Oakland Athletics and won the 2002 Cy Young Award — to being a liability for the Giants. Indeed, he only had one season in San Francisco where, again, by ERA+, he was a league-average starter or better. In 2010 he went 9-14 with a 4.15 ERA and was way worse than that down the stretch. It made perfect sense for the Giants to leave him off the 2010 postseason roster. And, of course, it worked out for them.

Things would improve. He’d still generally struggle as a Giant, but in 2012 he was a hero of the NLCS, pitching the Giants past the Cardinals in a must-win game. He then got the Game 1 start in the World Series and beat Justin Verlander as the Giants won that game and then swept the Tigers out of the series. As time went on he’d fine more personal happiness as well. When his contract ended following the 2013 season Zito took out a full-page ad in the San Francisco Chronicle thanking Giants fans for their support. He’d leave the game in 2014 and pitch three more games for the Athletics in 2015 before retiring for good.

Not many baseball memoirs deliver hard truths like Zito’s appears willing to do. That’s pretty damn brave of him. And pretty damn admirable.