Adam Jones gives Orioles lead with sacrifice fly

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The Orioles have pulled ahead again in Arlington. Adam Jones delivered a sacrifice fly in the top of the sixth inning to give the Orioles a 2-1 lead over the Rangers.

J.J. Hardy led off the sixth by dumping a single into shallow right field before Chris Davis singled to right to move him to third. Jones flew out deep to right field to bring Hardy home. Yu Darvish was then visited by a team trainer and his interpreter, as he looked to be favoring his neck and back, but he stayed in the game to get Matt Wieters to pop out to second base and Jim Thome to strike out looking on a nasty curveball.

Joe Saunders came back out for the bottom of the sixth and retired Josh Hamilton on a ground out and Adrian Beltre on a fly out before Buck Showalter brought the hook. Saunders ended up throwing 5 2/3 innings of one-run ball. Pretty good. And downright unexpected. Darren O’Day then got Nelson Cruz to fly out to right to end the inning. The Orioles have the lead as we move to the seventh.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

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Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.