Miguel Cabrera wins first Triple Crown since 1967

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Tigers slugger Miguel Cabrera entered tonight’s season finale against the Royals ranking first in the American League in batting average, homers and runs batted in. And that’s right where he’ll finish.

Cabrera went 0-for-2 with a strikeout on Wednesday night in Kansas City, but he walked off the field to a standing ovation from the Kauffman Stadium crowd when he was lifted as part of a double-switch in the bottom of the fourth inning. Because he had just locked up MLB’s first Triple Crown since 1967.

Cabrera winds up with a .330 batting average, 44 home runs and 139 RBI.

Carl Yastrzemski, the last Triple Crown winner, hit .326 with 44 homers and 121 RBI in his historical year.

The Angels’ Mike Trout will close out 2012 ranking second in batting at .326. Josh Hamilton and Curtis Granderson will wind up tied for second in dingers with 43. And Hamilton finishes second in RBI with 128.

Cabrera and the Tigers now advance to the ALDS, where they’ll take on the A’s beginning Saturday.

A couple of former major leaguers choose to stay in Asia

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Two guys who spent some time in the bigs but who have found more success in Asia have decided to stay in Asia.

Darin Ruf has re-signed with the Samsung Lions of KBO, per MLB Trade Rumors. Ruf, who played five years for the Phillies but didn’t really have the numbers to stick, has stuck just fine in Korea. In two seasons in the offense-friendly league he has hit 64 homers and has put up a line of .322/.412/.587. His new deal with Samsung will pay him a guaranteed $1.4 million with $300K in potential bonuses.

The other guy — Nick Martinez — has signed a $2.5 million plus incentives deal to stay with the Nippon Ham Fighters of NPB. The former Rangers starter went 10-11 with a 3.51 ERA for the Fighters in 2018. He was 17-30 with a 4.77 ERA in four seasons with Texas.

Maybe Ruf and Martinez still have U.S. major league dreams, but guaranteed bucks in the Korean and Japanese majors is better than signing minor league deals and riding busses here.