Hopefully Cliff Lee realizes wins are a dumb stat for pitchers

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Cliff Lee just tossed six innings of three-run ball in his final start of the season and has so often been the case he took a loss because the Phillies’ lineup scored all of one run.

Lee finishes the year with a 3.16 ERA and 207/28 K/BB ratio in 211 innings. And he’s going to wind up with a grand total of six wins. Or perhaps I should say six “wins” because of how silly the stat can be.

For instance, Ivan Nova has 12 “wins” with a 5.02 ERA in 170 innings and Bruce Chen has 11 “wins” with a 5.07 ERA in 192 innings.

Five times this season Lee allowed zero or one run in a start and failed to record a win. And he failed to get a win when allowing three or fewer runs a total of 14 times.

Matt Gelb of the Philadelphia Inquirer notes that Lee is now the first pitcher in baseball history to win fewer than eight games with 200-plus strikeouts and a sub-3.20 ERA. And, coincidentally I’m sure, Lee ranks 85th among 90 qualified pitchers in run support.

Brewers to give Mike Moustakas a look at second base

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The Brewers reportedly signed third baseman Mike Moustakas to a one-year, $10 million contract on Sunday. While the deal is not yet official, MLB.com’s Adam McCalvy reports that the Brewers plan to give Moustakas a look at second base during spring training. If all goes well, he will be the primary second baseman and Travis Shaw will stay at third base.

The initial thought was that Moustakas would simply take over at third base for the more versatile Shaw. Moustakas has spent 8,035 of his career defensive innings at third base, 35 innings at first base, and none at second. In fact, he has never played second base as a pro player. Shaw, meanwhile, has spent 268 of his 4,073 1/3 defensive innings in the majors at second base and played there as recently as October.

This is certainly an interesting wrinkle to signing Moustakas, who is a decent third baseman. He was victimized by another slow free agent market, not signing until March last year on a $6.5 million deal with a $15 million mutual option for this season. That option was declined, obviously, and he ended up signing for $5 million cheaper here in February as the Brewers waited him out. Notably, Moustakas did not have qualifying offer compensation attached to him this time around.

Last season, between the Royals and Brewers, the 30-year-old Moustakas hit .251/.315/.459 with 28 home runs and 95 RBI in 635 plate appearances.