Chipper Jones is the seventh member of .300/.400/.500 club

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As he nears retirement Chipper Jones’ greatness is hopeful apparent enough that we don’t really need to cite any new stats to make the case, but here’s a pretty good one courtesy of Capitol Avenue Club blogger Ben Duronio:

Among all the hitters in baseball history with at least 10,000 career plate appearances Jones is the seventh player to top a .300 batting average, .400 on-base percentage, and .500 slugging percentage.

Here’s a list of everyone in the .300/.400/.500 club: Jones, Frank Thomas, Stan Musial, Mel Ott, Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Tris Speaker.

And if you drop the plate appearance minimum down to 9,000 the club adds Ted Williams, Manny Ramirez, Jimmie Foxx, Lou Gehrig, Todd Helton, and Rogers Hornsby.

Jones, who’s not in the Braves’ lineup for today’s regular season finale, has hit .303 with a .401 OBP and .529 SLG in 10,613 plate appearances.

Report: Astros may have been cheating throughout the postseason

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Danny Picard of Boston Metro reports that, during Game 1 of the ALCS on Saturday, a man claiming to be an Astros employee was removed by security. The man was in the media-credentialed area next to the Red Sox dugout but he did not have media credentials. He was, however, using a small camera and texting frequently. When the man was taken away from the area, an Astros staffer tried to intervene, saying he was authorized to be in the area. Security did not buy the story, so the man was not allowed to return to that area but was allowed to remain in the ballpark.

This wasn’t the first time security had been made aware of the man. Apparently the same man had been up to some shady business during the ALDS against the Indians as well, which means the Astros may have been cheating throughout the postseason.

Representatives from all three teams have thus far opted not to comment on the matter. MLB chief communciations officer Pat Courtney said in an email on Tuesday, “We are aware of the matter and it will be handled internally.”

Teams, especially nowadays, are paranoid in the postseason about sign-stealing, so they’re always doing their due diligence to make sure their signs are secure. Sign-stealing is part of the gamesmanship of baseball. Players and coaches are, obviously, allowed to use their eyes, ears, and mouths to communicate about opposing teams’ signs. They’re not allowed to use any kind of technology, including cameras and cell phones. The Astros thought they could get away with this and they were wrong. Even if MLB’s look into the matter doesn’t result in anything, the Astros’ recent and upcoming accomplishments may be looked at with a raised eyebrow.