Mike Trout becomes youngest member of 30/30 club

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At the tender age of 21, Mike Trout became the youngest member of the 30 HR/30 SB club when he hit his 30th home run Sunday off the Rangers’ Yu Darvish.

Trout’s 30-30 season is the 60th in major league history. 37 different players had combined on the previous 59. The youngest to do it was 22-year-old Alex Rodriguez of the Mariners in 1998.

With 48 steals, Trout is one of 19 players to hit 30 homers and steal 40 bases in the same season. Matt Kemp was the last when he finished with 39 homers and 40 steals last year.

One imagines Trout should have at least one or two more 30-30 seasons in his future. Here’s a list of the players to do it multiple times in their careers:

5 – Barry Bonds, Bobby Bonds
4 – Alfonso Soriano
3 – Howard Johnson
2 – Bobby Abreu, Jeff Bagwell, Ryan Braun, Ron Gant, Vladimir Guerrero, Ian Kinsler, Willie Mays, Raul Mondesi, Sammy Sosa

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.