Miguel Cabrera is currently in Triple Crown position

74 Comments

Baseball’s Triple Crown is sort of cool because it’s been celebrated for close to a century and because 12 of the 13 players to accomplish the feat went on to join the Hall of Fame. It’s also outdated, as new stats have emerged that do a better job of evaluating offensive production. But enough of our lecturing.

Tigers third baseman Miguel Cabrera launched his 43rd home run of the season in Saturday afternoon’s 6-4 defeat of the Twins, moving back into position to capture the first Triple Crown since Carl Yastrzemski finished with a .326 batting average, 44 homers and 121 RBI over 161 games for the Red Sox in 1967.

Cabrera is sporting a .327 batting average. In second is Angels outfielder Mike Trout at .321.

Cabrera is up to 43 home runs, which has him tied with Josh Hamilton for the major league lead.

Cabrera has 136 RBI. Hamilton has 125 RBI. That advantage is likely safe with just four games to play.

Some might argue that a Triple Crown should lock up the American League MVP for Miggy, but the aforementioned Trout has the AL lead in OPS+ and is a far better defender and baserunner. It’ll be close.

Mickey Callaway will not be fired over his blowup at a reporter

Getty Images
3 Comments

As you no doubt saw already, Mets manager Mickey Callaway had a bad day yesterday. After some testy exchanges with the media over his bullpen use, he blew up at Newsday reporter Tim Healey after Healey told Callaway that he’d see him tomorrow, which Callaway took as sarcastic. Then Jason Vargas unhelpfully piled on, walking toward Healey and threatening him with violence. Healy spoke to his Newsday colleague David Lennon and explained the whole thing here. He’s pretty even-handed about it.

Callaway was already thought to be on at least moderately thin ice as Mets manager given his team’s underachievement this year. Thin ice or not, it’s not unreasonable to say that his behavior yesterday is something that a lot of teams would think of as a fireable offense. At the very least leaders in other businesses would think that way if one of their public-facing employees treated a reporter who covered him in that manner. In addition to it simply being bad form, it raises questions about Callaway’s temperament and his ability to handle pressure and adversity.

The Mets, however, do not seem to consider the matter to raise to that level. While they offered apologies to Healey and vowed that that he will be welcome in the clubhouse — for which Healey was appreciative — Callaway will be back to work as usual today, with the Mets announcing this morning that he will hold his usual pre-game press conference at 4PM in advance of tonight’s game against the Phillies.

Tell me: if you’re the GM or owner of a team and your manager does that, do you keep him? What do you do?