Lance Berkman admits he’s unlikely to return this year

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Cardinals first baseman Lance Berkman is taking regular batting practice and performing upper body workouts, but he hasn’t been able to do very much running and acknowledged to reporters on Saturday night that he is unlikely to make it back this season.

“It’s probably a long shot that I will be playing in the playoffs,” Berkman told MLB.com. “Even if I were to get back out there physically, you still have the issue of not being game-ready. I don’t think it would be fair to the team to be added to the playoff roster and take somebody’s spot that could actually help us win.”

The 36-year-old appeared in only 31 games this summer due to right and left knee issues, posting a .263/.385/.450 batting line with two home runs and seven RBI across 96 plate appearances.

Allen Craig has been filling in at first base nicely, but Berkman would have been a useful bench bat in October for the Cards. They entered play Sunday with a two-game lead on the second NL Wild Card spot.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

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Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.