TBS to offer all manner of high tech gizmos for its playoff broadcasts

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Yeah, I said gizmos. And every word of this post should be read as if you are on my lawn when you began it but are leaving my lawn at my request as you finish it:

TBS announced that its Major League Baseball post-season programming will include some new bells and whistles, including “3D hologram imagery.”

Specifically, TBS says it will use “innovative 3D imagery will illustrate detailed examples of pitch grips while demonstrating the pressure points, release points and rotation. Analysts will use the tool to explain how pitches work and how the hitter approaches each type of pitch.”

I suppose it’s too much to ask for a Tupac-style hologram of Skip Caray to call these games?

Oh well. Progress marches forward. Progress also tends to cause us to miss several pitches each game because progress is so damn enamored with its little toys that it can’t get back to the game action in time.  Progress also tends to forget that Ron Darling is totally capable of explaining how a curveball works without that noise.

Sigh.

Astros release Jon Singleton

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The Astros have released first baseman Jon Singleton, Chandler Rome of the Houston Chronicle reports.

Singleton, 26, was suspended for 100 games after testing positive for a drug of abuse for a third time. He has had issues with marijuana in the post and admitted to being a drug addict several years ago. He said, “At this point it’s pretty evident to me that I’m a drug addict. I don’t openly tell everyone that, but it’s pretty apparent to myself. I know that I enjoy smoking weed, I enjoy being high and I can’t block that out of my mind that I enjoy that. So I have to work against that.”

Singleton played parts of two seasons in the majors in 2014-15 with the Astros, batting a combined .171/.290/.331 with 14 home runs and 50 RBI in — appropriately — 420 plate appearances. He spent 2016 with Triple-A Fresno and 2017 with Double-A Corpus Christi, putting up middling numbers.

If he can convince teams he’s still actively working to overcome his addiction, Singleton may be able to find an opportunity elsewhere. But his road back to the majors remains long. He was once a top prospect in the Phillies’ system, then was traded to the Astros in the Hunter Pence deal back in July 2011.