Ubaldo Jimenez’s season is over

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Mercifully so.

Ubaldo Jimenez, loser of his last six decisions and 17 games overall, won’t pitch again this season because of a sprained ankle.

Jimenez finishes up 9-17 with a 5.55 ERA and a 143/95 K/BB ratio in 176 2/3 innings. He’s 13-21 with a 5.43 ERA in 242 innings since the Indians traded arguably their two top pitching prospects — Drew Pomeranz and Alex White — to the Rockies for him in mid-2011.

The Indians will have to decide this winter whether to exercise Jimenez’s $5.75 million option for 2013, to decline it and go through the arbitration process or to non-tender him. Since the option comes with a $1 million buyout, picking it up probably makes the most sense. It’s doubtful he’d come any cheaper than $4.75 million through arbitration, and even though he’s been a huge disappointment, it’d be worth it to give him one more year and see what happens. It’s not as though the Indians have a ton of young pitching busting down the door.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.