Thanks to the mega Dodgers sale, Frank and Jamie McCourt are back in court

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Aww, I missed you guys! I really, really did!

The ex-wife of former Los Angeles Dodgers owner Frank McCourt wants to set aside the couple’s divorce settlement, claiming he vastly understated the value of a team that sold earlier this year for $2 billion, the highest figure ever paid for a pro sports franchise.

Jamie McCourt’s attorney, Bertram Fields, told The Associated Press that she “thought very long and very hard about whether to file this motion” but that after other means failed, she returned to court.

Jamie McCourt, you’ll recall, settled their divorce case for $131 million.  This was back when Frank McCourt didn’t look like he’d end up with a pot to piss in because absolutely no one figured he’d get $2 billion for the Dodgers.  At the time she and her quite able legal staff made what they thought was a good deal.

Her theory is fraud — that Frank misrepresented the value of the Dodgers.  I presume the counter will be that hanging on for the ride in the sale of a professional sports franchise is a risky endeavor and, by settling before the sale, Jamie decided not to assume any risk yet now wants the rewards of that sale.

I really don’t know the intricacies of rich people divorce cases, so I have no idea if she has a leg to stand on, legally speaking.  But my kneejerk reaction is to say that it takes an awful lot of chutzpah to sleep with the help, blow up the marriage, sue your ex, settle for well over $100 million as everyone in the world is also going after him and then, over a year later, come back and say “please, sir, I’d like some more.”

That said, the fact that I can muster any sympathy for a guy like McCourt here kind of turns my stomach, so maybe I should just root for expensive, protracted litigation that bankrupts them both and leaves no winners.

Video reviews overturn 42% rate; Boston most successful

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NEW YORK (AP) Video reviews overturned 42.4% of calls checked during Major League Baseball’s shortened regular season, down slightly from 44% in 2019.

Boston was the most successful team, gaining overturned calls on 10 of 13 challenges for 76.9%. The Chicago White Sox were second, successful on eight of 11 challenges for 72.7%, followed by Kansas City at seven of 10 (70%).

Pittsburgh was the least successful at 2 of 11 (18.2%), and Toronto was 7 of 25 (28%).

Minnesota had the most challenges with 28 and was successful on nine (32.1%). The New York Yankees and Milwaukee tied for the fewest with nine each; the Yankees were successful on five (55.6%) and the Brewers three (33.3%).

MLB said Tuesday there were 468 manager challenges and 58 crew chief reviews among 526 total reviews during 898 games. The average time of a review was 1 minute, 25 seconds, up from 1:16 the previous season, when there 1,186 manager challenges and 170 crew chief reviews among 1,356 reviews during 2,429 games.

This year’s replays had 104 calls confirmed (19.8%), 181 that stood (34.4%) and 223 overturned. An additional 12 calls (2.3%) were for rules checks and six (1.1%) for recording keeping.

In 2019 there were 277 calls confirmed (12.5%), 463 that stood (34.1%) and 597 overturned. An additional nine calls (0.7%) were for rules checks and 10 (0.7%) for record keeping.

Expanded video review started in 2014.