Nationals want him back, but will Davey Johnson keep managing after this season?

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By moving from the front office to the dugout in the middle of last season Davey Johnson is in a unique situation with the Nationals, as his contract as manager ends after this season while his contract as a team consultant runs through 2013.

General manager Mike Rizzo made it very clear that he wants Johnson back next season, but there was never any doubt about that considering the Nationals’ league-best 93-61 record and seemingly roster-wide respect for the manager.

However, the 69-year-old Johnson has stopped just short of saying he’ll definitely be back as manager, telling Bill Ladson of MLB.com:

I’ve had conversations with Rizzo about that, and he had conversations with ownership. I feel good about my situation. I feel good about where we are at. Those things will be addressed after the season. I think Rizzo and ownership are perfectly comfortable when deciding to have me back after this season is over. Again, I’m comfortable with that, too. Let’s see what happens.

Johnson added that he won’t talk to Rizzo about contract stuff until after the playoffs, by which point he might be thinking about going out on a high note or at least have some pretty great leverage for a big raise. According to Barry Svrluga of the Washington Post “neither seem concerned that the talks will result in anything other than a new deal.”

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

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Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.