And the award for MLB’s most biased announcer goes to …

63 Comments

Some studies have unexpected results that change the way people think about a subject. This is not one of them.

Jared Diamond of the Wall Street Journal watched a local broadcast of all 30 teams to track the announcers’ level of bias and concluded that longtime White Sox play-by-play man Hawk Harrelson is indeed the biggest homer around.

“Credit” was given when an announcer used we/us/our as their pronoun of choice or referred to a player as some sort of pet name and according to Diamond “additional penalties were given for things like excessive moping after miscues or unrestrained glee after big moments.”

Harrelson is the king of all those things, so not surprisingly he (and partner Steve Stone) blew away the competition by making what Diamond determined to be 104 “biased statements” during a single game. Next-closest was the Indians’ crew of Matt Underwood and Rick Manning with 23 biased statements.

And of course Harrelson being Harrelson, he was thrilled to find out he lapped the field:

You just made my day. That’s the biggest compliment you could give me, to call me the biggest homer in baseball.

For the full results of Diamond’s study, click here.

Report: Major League Baseball bans transactions with Mexican League teams

Getty Images
7 Comments

Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports reports that Major League Baseball has banned all transactions with Liga Mexicana de Beisbol (LMB), popularly known as the Mexican League. As of now, all 30 teams are prohibited from signing players under contract with LMB teams. The ban was issued due to Major League Baseball’s contention that “corruption” and “fraud” run rampant in the player acquisition process.

Passan describes the issues in detail, and they sound pretty compelling. The upshot: LMB clubs — which have full control over their players — are taking advantage of them, taking most if not all of the signing bonuses MLB teams give them after negotiating for their rights. Mexican teams often sign players when they’re 15 years-old so that, once they are old enough for American teams to approach them, they’re in the position to take a usurious cut.

Passan says Major League Baseball is demanding greater transparency from LMB before it’s willing to lift the ban. He also says that the MLBPA is in “lockstep” with Major League Baseball on the matter, which makes sense given that, if MLB’s claims are accurate, players are being exploited here. He also says that if LMB does not change its ways, there is a “Plan B,” though it’s not clear what that is.

There aren’t a ton of Mexican players signed by MLB teams each year, but there are enough to make this a significant issue that is worth watching.