Ichiro Suzuki treats his bats “like a rock musician with a guitar”

16 Comments

Ichiro Suzuki is hitting again with a .328 batting average and .831 OPS since joining the Yankees, but even while struggling with the Mariners he never took it out on his bats.

In fact, as David Waldstein wrote about for the New York Times, Suzuki treats his bats amazingly well:

Suzuki neatly stacks his best eight bats inside a shockproof, moisture-free black case that he keeps close by his locker at home and on the road.

“He dresses like a rock star and he carries his bats around in a case like a rock musician with a guitar,” Yankees pitcher Boone Logan said. “It fits his style perfectly.”

The case, which looks like a mini trunk, not only protects the bats from jostling and banging during transports, it also serves as a dehumidifier, drawing moisture out of the bats during the hot, humid American summers.

“In New York, Texas, Baltimore, you take your bat from the clubhouse to the dugout and it’s like it’s sweating from all the moisture,” he said through his interpreter. “It’s really shocking to see it.”

Waldstein’s article has a lot more where that came from, including Suzuki’s various theories on how moisture impacts his hitting. It’s a very good read and Suzuki’s whole routine comes off as more meticulous than insane … although maybe that’s just because the guy has 2,600 hits in 12 seasons.

Peter Bourjos returns to the Angels on minor league deal

Peter Bourjos
Getty Images
1 Comment

Free agent outfielder Peter Bourjos is heading back to the Angels on a minor league deal, per a report from Steve Adams of MLB Trade Rumors. The agreement includes an invitation to spring training, but has not yet been officially confirmed by the team.

Bourjos, 31, played out a one-year gig with the Braves in 2018 and slashed .205/.239/.364 with four extra-base hits and a .603 OPS through a career-low 47 plate appearances. He showed more promise during a short-lived stint with the Giants’ Triple-A squad in the second half of the season, but elected free agency in early November and had yet to catch on with another major league club. His deal with the Angels represents a homecoming of sorts, as he played some of the best years of his career in Anaheim from 2010 to 2013 before getting traded to the Cardinals in a multiplayer swap for David Freese and Fernando Salas in 2014.

The veteran outfielder is long past his prime, but could still bring some value to the team as outfield depth behind Justin Upton, Mike Trout, and Kole Calhoun. Per Adams, he’s expected to compete for a spot as the Angels’ fourth outfielder, though he also has limited experience at DH as well.