Jeremy Hefner can’t get an out against the Phillies

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The Mets’ Jeremy Hefner was pulled from his start Thursday against the Phillies after failing to retire any of the seven batters he faced.

Hefner gave up six singles in a row, including a bunt single to Juan Pierre, and then walked Kevin Frandsen with the bases loaded before being replaced by Collin McHugh.

Since all three inherited runners came around to score of McHugh, Hefner was charged with seven earned runs.

Hefner is the fifth starter this year to leave without retiring a batter, but the first to do so due to ineffectiveness. Jered Weaver, P.J. Walters and Brandon Morrow were injured in their starts, and Zack Greinke was ejected from his.

The last starter to depart under circumstances similar to Hefner’s was the Cubs’ Randy Wells on May 28, 2010. He gave up hits to all six batters he faced before being removed from an outing against the Cardinals.

Hefner became the eighth starter since 2000 to give up seven runs without recording an out:

Armando Reynoso (Ari): Apr. 23, 2000 vs. SF
Dennis Tankersley (SD): Apr. 9, 2003 vs. SF
Paul Wilson (Cin): July 10, 2003 vs. Hou (8 R, 7 ER)
Ryan Vogelsong (Pit): Sept. 24, 2004 vs. Cin
Paul Wilson (Cin): May 6, 2005 vs. LAD (8 ER)
J.D. Durbin (Phi): Sept. 1, 2007 vs. Fla
Jason Marquis (Was): Apr. 18, 2010 vs. Mil

MLB calls umpire union statement about Manny Machado discipline “inappropriate”

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Earlier today the Major League Baseball Umpire’s Association made multiple posts on social media registering its displeasure at what it feels was the league’s weak discipline of Manny Machado following his run-in with umpire Bill Welke. It was an unusual statement, as it’s not common for umpires, individual or via their union to comment on such matters.

This evening, in an official statement, the league called it inappropriate:

“Manny Machado was suspended by MLB Chief Baseball Officer Joe Torre, who considered all the facts and circumstances of Machado’s conduct, including precedent, in determining the appropriate level of discipline.  Mr. Machado is appealing his suspension and we do not believe it is appropriate for the union representing Major League Umpires to comment on the discipline of players represented by the Players Association, just as it would not be appropriate for the Players Association to comment on disciplinary decisions made with respect to umpires.  We also believe it is inappropriate to compare this incident to the extraordinarily serious issue of workplace violence.”

That final bit, about workplace violence, is something that I didn’t really consider when I read the umps’ statements, but it’s a damn good point. In an age where people are literally shooting up workplaces, umpires making reference to that kind of thing in response to a player throwing a bat is pretty rich indeed. And in pretty poor taste.