Ryan Braun hits 200th, 201st career homers versus Mets

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3:40 p.m. EDT update: Braun just added his second solo shot of the game, giving him 201 career homers.

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Ryan Braun became the seventh player in major league history to reach 200 homers within his first six seasons when he took the Mets’ Chris Young deep on Sunday.

Here’s the list of players with the most homers through six seasons:

257 – Ralph Kiner (1946-51)
250 – Albert Pujols (2001-06)
222 – Ryan Howard (2004-09)
222 – Eddie Mathews (1952-57)
203 – Mark Teixeira (2003-08)
202 – Frank Robinson (1956-61)
200 – Ryan Braun (2007-12)
198 – Joe DiMaggio (1936-41)
198 – Adam Dunn (2001-06)
197 – Ted Williams (1939-47)

Braun went to college and didn’t debut in the majors until age-23, so he wouldn’t fare so well on an age-based home run list. Still, this is pretty impressive company he’s keeping here.

In case you’re wondering how the all-time home run leaders fared through six seasons, Hank Aaron is tops in the 700 club, with 179 homers. Barry Bonds had 142 homers through six seasons (23 fewer than his father had). Still pitching for Boston, Babe Ruth had 59 homers in his first six seasons.

Red Sox employees “livid” over team pay cut plan

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Even Drellich of The Athletic reports that the Boston Red Sox are cutting the pay of team employees. Those cuts, which began to be communicated last night, apply to all employees making $50,000 or more. They are tiered cuts, with people making $50-99,000 seeing salary cut by 20%, those making $100k-$499,000 seeing $25% cuts and those making $500,000 or more getting 30% cuts.

Drellich reported that a Red Sox employee told him that “people are livid” over the fact that those making $100K are being treated the same way as those making $500K. And, yes, that does seem to be a pretty wide spread for similar pay cuts. One would think that a team with as many analytically-oriented people on staff could perhaps break things down a bit more granularly.

Notable in all of this that the same folks who own the Red Sox — Fenway Sports Group — own Liverpool FC of the English Premier League, and that just last month Liverpool’s pay cut/employee furlough policies proved so unpopular that they led to a backlash and a subsequent reversal by the club. That came after intense criticism from Liverpool fan groups and local politicians. Sox owner John Henry must be confident that no such backlash will happen in Boston.

As we noted yesterday, The Kansas City Royals, who are not as financially successful as the Boston Red Sox, have not furloughed employees or cut pay as a result of baseball’s shutdown in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Perhaps someone in Boston could call the Royals and ask them how they managed that.