How hard did Yadier Molina throw that ball last night?

14 Comments

Still going back and admiring that Yadier Molina putout last night. Just wonderful.

In the post about it I wondered how hard he threw that ball.  There have been at least two attempts at explanations so far.  The first one I saw came from commenter Ryan:

And a radar gun would be way better, but some back-of-the-envelope math suggests he threw it around 85 mph.

distance from home to 2nd base: ~127 feet; the throw was caught a little short and off of 2nd, so ~125 feet
timing with a crappy cellphone stopwatch: ~1.0 seconds from release to catch
125 feet/second = 85 mph

A lot of potential error in the timing measurement, but mid-eighties is probably about right. I wonder any catchers can throw any harder?

Then commenter dan1111 added:

It’s even more impressive when you consider that pitch speed is measured at the release point. 85 mph average over that distance is at least a low 90s fastball.

Another attempt at measuring the velocity came from Larry Granillo of Baseball Prospectus. Well, smart people he  asked about it, but he published it.  It comes in at a much lower, but still impressive speed: out of the hand at 83, averaging 72 m.p.h.  Click through to see his methodology.

Either way: damn impressive for a catcher who did not have the benefit of a mound, a fully upright position, a big stride and a windup.

Kenley Jansen expected to be OK for spring training after heart procedure

Kenley Jansen
Getty Images
Leave a comment

Building on a report from early September, Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen is slated to undergo a heart procedure on November 26. The estimated recovery time ranges from two to eight weeks, according to comments Jansen made Friday, and he expects to be able to rejoin the team once spring training rolls around next year.

Jansen, 31, was first diagnosed with an irregular heartbeat in 2011 and missed significant time during the 2011, 2012, and 2018 seasons due to the condition. He underwent his first surgery to correct the irregularity in 2012, but suffered recurring symptoms that could not be treated long-term with the heart medication and blood thinners that had been prescribed to him. Scarier still was the “atrial fibrillation episode” that the reliever experienced during a road trip to Colorado in August; per MLB.com’s Ken Gurnick, the high altitude exacerbated his heart condition and left him susceptible to future episodes in the event that he chose to return to the Rockies’ Coors Field.

Heart issues notwithstanding, the veteran right-hander pitched through his third straight All-Star season in 2018. Overall, he saw a downward trend in most of his stats, but still collected 38 saves in 59 opportunities and finished the season with a respectable 3.01 ERA, 2.1 BB/9 and 10.3 SO/9 through 71 2/3 innings. In October, he helped carry the Dodgers to their second consecutive pennant and wrapped up his sixth postseason run with three saves, two blown saves, and a 1.69 ERA across 10 2/3 innings.